Lolas’ House: Filipino Women Living with War by M. Evelina Galang

“During World War II more than one thousand Filipinas were kidnapped by the Imperial Japanese Army. Lolas’ House tells the stories of sixteen surviving Filipino “comfort women.” M. Evelina Galang enters into the lives of the women at Lolas’ House, a community center in metro Manila. She accompanies them to the sites of their abduction and protests … More Lolas’ House: Filipino Women Living with War by M. Evelina Galang

Influential African-American SF Writers of the 20th Century: Octavia E. Butler

I began writing about power because I had so little, Octavia E. Butler once said. Butler’s life as an African American woman–an alien in American society and among science fiction writers–informed the powerful works that earned her an ardent readership and acclaim both inside and outside science fiction. Gerry Canavan offers a critical and holistic … More Influential African-American SF Writers of the 20th Century: Octavia E. Butler

Year in Books 2016 – Part 3 – Contemporary fiction & Non-fiction

My 2016 favourites list in three parts: Part 1 – YA Speculative fiction and fantasy, Part 2 – Adult Speculative fiction and fantasy & Part 3 – Contemporary fiction and Non-fiction. Thanks to all the readers who have dropped by for these lists! Onto the final one: Contemporary fiction Becoming Kirrali Lewis by Jane Harrison A great … More Year in Books 2016 – Part 3 – Contemporary fiction & Non-fiction

Yassmin’s Story by Yassmin Abdel-Magied

Frank, fearless, funny, articulate and inspiring, Yassmin Abdel-Magied is a dynamo, a young Muslim dynamo offering a bracing breath of fresh air – and hope. At 21, Yassmin found herself working on a remote Australian oil and gas rig; she was the only woman and certainly the only Sudanese-Egyptian-Australian background Muslim woman. With her hijab … More Yassmin’s Story by Yassmin Abdel-Magied

A Recommendation for International Women’s Day: Letters to Tiptree

For nearly a decade, a middle-aged woman in Virginia (her own words) had much of the science fiction community in thrall. Her short stories were awarded, lauded and extremely well-reviewed. They were also regarded as “ineluctably masculine,” because Alice Sheldon was writing as James Tiptree Jr. In celebration of Alice Sheldon’s centenary, Letters to Tiptree presents … More A Recommendation for International Women’s Day: Letters to Tiptree